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This progression very eloquently illustrates one of the most basic functionalities of western tonal music — the subdominant (IV chord – G), moving to the dominant (V chord – A), and resolving to the tonic (I chord – D). This is a sound that transcends all genre barriers and ties tons of music together. We can find a very rich body of work in this sound throughout history, from classical music, to much folk music, to contemporary pop hits of each generation.

A mere mortal bass player might have connected the V chord to the VI- by playing the note in between the roots of each. But Paul McCartney starts the sequence two beats early, playing the root of the V and going down a half step before his three-note climb, resulting in a five-note run that fills out the entire gap in the vocals. Of course, little did I know at the time that this famous mop-top had gone on to be one of the most influential bass players ever.

It’s very fluid and overlapped as to where the bridge stops and the verses begin with these mercurial lyrics bleeding over the bars like too much bubbly poured into your champagne flute. The outro gives you a funky meter fake-out. It sounds like they went to triplets or something, but all those odd accents still subdivide over three solid bars, believe it or not.

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Your narrative could be a very big-picture look at your career as a whole, or you can create mini-narratives around much smaller events, like a particular album. And finally a narrative should be a part of how you communicate with your fans every single day. It’s not always about sharing your whole story in one breath. Instead think about how the content you’re creating every day relates to your story as an artist.

The album is filled with so many glorious quotes and clichés (this is a high compliment). I never got tired of listening. With so many possibilities, how do you hone in on and develop your better ideas?

You can hear how popular this song really was in Live at the Apollo by listening to how bonkers the crowd goes during that track. But while their faith may have been restored, they still didn’t see Brown as anything more than a single artist, inconsistent at best.

Whether you consider yourself an electronic producer, songwriter, amateur musician, or synthesist, if you plan to be creating musical work on your own, it’s vital to understand how to turn raw ideas into songs, organize and construct various song sections and integrate them together fluidly, and make your track listenable to a wide audience range.

It’s often the case that in concert and in these symphonic works designed to highlight the theremin, we’re really able to hear its full range and expressive potential. So we’ve picked out five pieces from modern 20th century composers (some of which were written to accompany film) that have helped define the use of this instrument in a variety of capacities.

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“Musica Ricercata” is a work consisting of 11 movements for solo piano, which make use of two notes in the first movement, three in the second, four in the third and so on, featuring the full chromatic scale in the last movement of the work. We will look at the first movement for its unusual and brave choice of using a single note for an entire composition (or as we’ll see, for all but the last four measures).

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His yodeling obsession was accompanied by a love of obscure stringed instruments like the zither and hammered dulcimer, both of which he taught himself as a child. In his teens, Ischi taught himself to yodel by listening to Franzl Lang records and imitating what he heard. In case you aren’t familiar, Lang is one of yodeling’s most revered figures and is widely known as the “Yodel King.”

Ludwig van Beethoven’s “Für Elise” provides us with the first example of a minor second, and it can be found in the first “seconds” of the piece — in other words, the first two notes are a descending minor second apart.

Born in Cambridge, England, Judith Weir’s musical path has been a very British one. Having studied with Sir John Taverner at an early age and later at King’s College Cambridge, Weir’s music proudly takes inspiration from British medieval history and the traditional folk arts of her parents’ homeland of Scotland. Another star-studded member of this list, Weir won an Ivor Novello Award in 2015 and a year earlier was appointed the first female Master of the Queen’s Music, a position which she currently holds for ten years, succeeding Sir Peter Maxwell Davis. True to her traditional roots and interests, Weir’s music has strong roots in British choral music, yet her output also includes eight operas, many orchestral works, chamber pieces, and solo instrumental pieces. If you’re after something modern and yet deeply rooted in tradition, I highly recommend the work of Dame Judith Weir.