Rap albums 2017

In addition to tax returns and detailed income statements, lenders often ask for a profit and loss statement. This may throw you for a loop considering it’s something normally asked of a business not an individual, but in the bank’s eyes you are a business since you are a 1099 contractor!

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Cultural and historical endowment

“God’s Plan”: Man, the chords in this loop were hard to identify. Not only because the notes here don’t conform to standard A-440 tuning (it’s all about 20 cents sharp of G major), but because they start out as ninth chords whose upper halves are louder and more timbre-distinct than their lower, arpeggio-happy halves. It’s almost like it’s better explained not as “9-chords,” but as “an Em stacked on top of an Am,” and then “a D chord stacked on a G chord.” This “separation” thinking is enhanced by the low-muffled organ patch playing the Am and G, and the more trebly organ patch playing the Em and D.

“Meant to Be”: We’ve got a very cool, non-standard “shuffle treatment” of a chorus here. The chorus itself is AABA, and after the second chorus they chop it up and shuffle it to make a new section that goes BBA, which I’m going to call a modified half-chorus (c2). Then, we have the shortest bridge in history, just two pop-perfect bars of “maybe”s. Next we’ve got a more proper “non-chopped” half-chorus to end it. And we gotta give a shout-out to the inverted V chord they snuck in there with the moving bass line in the chorus.

My production challenge this month was an exercise in adaptivity. Instead of going out and finding outdoor sounds to capture and sample, like we did for April’s monthly challenge, we were tasked with the wonderful opportunity to use sounds from a brand new hip-hop adjacent sample pack that launched recently on Splice. [*Skip ahead to hear my final track.]

Mickey’s got a serious talent for writing relatable, bittersweet lyrics. You can rock out to his growing pain, while his bright guitar soothes. His live shows are pretty rare these days, so make an effort to catch him!

I was thinking about “Clair de Lune” and how strange and complicated the rhythm is. I was humming it to myself and couldn’t figure out where the downbeats were. I have previously used Ableton Live to help me learn a classical piece aurally, so I figured I would do the same thing with this one.

Upcoming rappers 2019

When recording acoustic guitars, most of the tone is going to come from the guitar itself, the microphone you chose, and the room you record in. You can find some great-sounding acoustic guitars for under $500 that can easily be used for recording. Pair one of these up with the right microphone and a recording space with great acoustics, and you’re good to go. [*Here are some quick tips on recording acoustic guitars if you need them!]

The problem is, a bank doesn’t always see it that way. If they look at your returns and see huge write-offs (even if you made good money), they may see you as a less than ideal applicant. It boils down to banks looking at gross income for W4 earners, and net for 1099 earners — which automatically puts you at a disadvantage.

Convenient though it is, some musicians don’t want to accommodate a 12-TET, insisting instead that we continue to use pure intervals derived from harmonics the way God and Pythagoras intended. Harmonics-based tuning systems are collectively known as just intonation. This is a poetically apt term, because it implies fairness. By contrast, the implicit message of 12-TET is that life isn’t fair. As we’ve learned, just intonation systems give you some lovely pure intervals, but are severely limited otherwise. A few malcontents prefer alternative historical compromise tuning systems that make some keys sound better at the expense of others sounding worse. There are many such esoteric temperament systems, but none of them are in widespread use.

Jeremy is a Montreal-based musician, sound artist and improviser who loves giving advice to emerging artists on how to make their tours more effective. He writes, records and performs electroacoustic “concrète” music for tape, oscillators and amplified objects and surfaces, as well as solo guitar. He has performed and released material throughout Europe and the UK, Asia, the US and Canada, mostly with his trio Sontag Shogun.

So I wanted to pluck out a bunch of very famous songs from between the ’60s and ’80s where these stalwart rhythm-section warriors were able to eek out a few moments of their own in the limelight — those fleeting moments where any listener can catch the bass filling an iota of space very cleverly, or otherwise blending particularly well with the vocal, lead guitar, or other instrument. We’ll also examine the melodic techniques used in each case.